Sunday, 13 August 2017

My Guest Writer Glynis Smy.

I was going to introduce my guest Glynis Smy by asking her a series of questions, but on second thoughts, I think it might be better to let Glynis introduce herself and tell us about the books she has written. 




Author Glynis Smy
Thank you Carole. I live in England, in the seaside town of Dovercourt - Harwich, where I enjoy writing novels. I've written historical romance and suspense, medical romance, poetry and short stories. My latest genre is crime, where I introduce detective Morag ‘Rags’ Blake, and my new book about a detective, WHITEFOAM, will be   available in 2018.   


Over the years I've written short stories in a variety of genres. I've also won a few poetry contests, my first was at the age of twelve, (a poem about the Bangladeshi war). I also won a children's short story competition where the prize was a first-aid box. I was so proud, but my husband found it amusing because we owned two pharmacies. My articles have been published in magazines both in the UK and Cyprus, and I am also featured in various places on-line.

The Victorian era has always fascinated me, as I find the best part of writing a novel is often the research. And I think the hours of research, together with my love of the Victorian period, was well worth while, for a proud writing moment in my life was when I was short-listed for the Festival of Romance Fiction 2014 for the New Talent Award, and when I reached the second round of the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award in 2014.  


Ripper, My Love is about growing up in late nineteenth century East London, and how Kitty Harper’s life is filled with danger and death – from her mother, her beloved neighbour and the working women of the streets. 


The second of my Victorian series was Maggie's Child, which reached number one on Amazon's Historical Romance best-seller list. The story is about farmer’s wife, Maggie Sawbury who gives birth to her fifth child, the only child to live and is the result of an extra-marital affair.  Maggie is heartbroken and desperate, for she knows her joyless life with a bully of a husband is not one her child should endure, and she leaves the baby at the roadside to be found by passers-by.


The third in my Victorian series, Ripped Genes, a sequel to Ripper, My Love, is again about Kitty Harper, a young seamstress from Whitechapel, London. The novel tells how she falls victim to the notorious murderer, Jack the Ripper, how she survives, and how he destroys everything that is precious to her. 


Thank you so much, Glynis. I have found your books fascinating, the subject matter so original. And as one of your hundreds of readers, I can't wait to read the first in your coming detective Morag Blake series, when published next year! 

Do follow Glynis on social media sites:

https://glynissmyauthor.com/blog/
https://twitter.com/GlynisSmy

and do sign up for Glynis's newsletter on her Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/glynissmyauthor/

Thursday, 10 August 2017

Jelly

Another Jelly meeting at the Alb, Shrewsbury. Do you remember Jelly, an idea imported from America? Termed 'Jelly', equivalent to our word 'jam', it was for people who worked alone, running their own small businesses and was the forerunner of today's business hubs, such as the MarchesGrowth Hub in Shrewsbury.  Good to see that there are still people who keep Jelly meetings going and that Jelly is still advertised on Eventbrite.

Sunday, 6 August 2017

Pet Peeves - Reading, Writing and Editing

Hello again.

Pet Peeves was the theme for Alex's latest blog hop in August, and although I didn't use it at the time, it interested me very much.

Reading? I have begun to follow writer  Stephen King's advice given in his brilliant book, 'On Writing', one of the best books on the subject I've ever come across. In it, he says that he reads every day, even including Christmas Day. I don't think I'd go as far as that, but he is right when he says that it is only by reading other writer's that our own ability improves. I think of myself of a lapsed reader, having spent my teens and twenties glued to a book, I am busy trying to catch up.

Writing? Again Stephen King is correct when he says that unless we write daily, when we return to our work it is stale and we've lost the momentum. Yes, we know this, but how many writers ignore this fact of our writing lives to our cost?

And finally, Editing? If you can't afford a living, breathing editor of some ability, then the next best thing is the app. Pro Writing Aid. I'm sure many writers would recommend other programmes, but this works for me, wouldn't be without it, and it fits neatly into any Word file you have created. Now to put my own advice, or mostly Stephen King's excellent advice into practice! 

Interviewing Romance Author Glynis Smy

Hello again. I shall be posting an interview with romance author Glynis Smy on my blog 
on the 14th August and I'm sure Glynis is looking forward to seeing you here. These author talks are proving very useful for beginning and well established authors and have created a great deal of interest. I shall be looking forward to interviewing Ian Steventon and Deniz Bevan and Tracey Swain  in the days to come, and I know their comments, on the problems facing writers and photographers as they work to become established, will be thought provoking.
Enjoy your writing adventures, thanks for taking an interest, with kind regards, Carole.

Wrekin Writers busy at work.

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

For IWSG - An Interview with freelance writer Julie Louise Phillips


Welcome Julie, and thank you for agreeing to be interviewed today. I know you have worked hard, like so many authors, to establish yourself as a writer -  having success with your short stories and spending long hours researching in local libraries, obtaining first hand information of historical interest, - and it would be helpful to others just beginning their writing journeys to hear something about how you achieved your success. First of all, I'd like to ask you if you have attended writing courses, writer's retreats, and if you found this helpful?


Julie Louise Phillips
Yes, I did a year’s Creative Writing course with the Open University in 2007/8 and a Writers Bureau course in article writing too. I also went on a writers’ holiday in Fishguard this time last year.  I’ve also been to the National Association of Writing Groups’ writing conference a couple of times and three retreats with my writing group. They were well worth going on because you meet other writers and learn a lot about writing skills.


Do you find social media helpful? Or just time consuming?

It's fits and starts with me regarding social media. Sometimes I use it a lot, and then not so much. It was beginning to impact on my writing time, and I have to write when I can because I work in a local school. So when it is term-time, I only access social media at weekends and I impose a time limit. It's far too easy to be distracted by social media. 


Are you a member of a business group, do you undertake book signings or visit Book Fairs. Are your books in local libraries? Are you to be found at workshops and do you give talks at book festivals or as visiting author in schools? 

No, I'm not a member of a business group, but I do hold book signings and I am available to give writing related workshops. I find most libraries will only have your books on their shelves is you donate a book first, and as I think libraries are to be treasured, I am happy to give them one of my books. I did facilitate an author visit for a friend that was amazing, and I would like to undertake an author visit myself in the future. 

Are you aware of your target audience, and if so, how do you connect with them?

Via my publishers really. I had some feedback from families through them, people whose ancestors featured in my WW1 books and that was nice.

Do you have a publisher, or are you self-published? How did you go about seeing your books in print?

I have a publisher for my non-fiction, although I haven't ruled out self-publishing. I sent a synopsis to the publisher and they accepted it. 


Do you belong, or have you at some time, belonged to a writer's group, and did you find this useful?


Yes, Wrekin Writers based in Telford. They are absolutely responsible for me getting my writing act together and being published. I would recommend that people do join a writing group, but make sure it is right for you. Not all writing groups are a good place for everyone, so shop around. 


    Do you use libraries for your research, online resources or both? 

For my WW1 books I used three libraries and also did some research on-line and in museum archives. I also used an on-line newspaper archive and the archives at Birmingham Library as well as buying related books on Amazon to read and going out and interviewing people. 

At what stage did you begin to think yourself , or call yourself, a writer?

I still don’t!  I still can’t believe I’ve had anything published. To me it’s a passion. I love reading and writing but it isn’t ‘work’ to me, it’s a pleasure.


Do you read ‘how-to’ books and are there any you would recommend for the writer who is just starting on a career?


Yes. I think they are good for new writers as they give you some ideas on how to go about writing. Simon Whaley’s books on writing are great as are Jane Wenham-Jones’s Wanna Be a Writer books. Della Galton has a good book out on writing short stories too.



Could you tell us what you are working on at present, and in what direction you think your writing will take in the future?


I am working on my 5th book for the publisher Pen and Sword. It is a book about suffragettes and women of note in  Birmingham, but I shall still write short stories for women's magazines. I'd like to finish a novel and get that published. 


And finally, could you provide advice for the beginning writers out there? 

I'm not one for making resolutions, as I think they're only good for setting us up to fail. There's so much pressure to do things better or to be a better person that it's no wonder we don't succeed and abandon our intentions a few weeks later.

Writing is also like that. We get all excited about a new idea and are completely absorbed in it for a while, only to fall out of love with it and never finish it.
The key I've found is, before I even write a word, I look back at those projects and ask myself why I abandoned them. The answer is usually that I became bored with it or simply didn't know how to advance with it, so I just gave up. I then make myself look at the abandoned project and try and, if I think I can, I try and finish it. This process then allows me to move on to the next project without the Spectre of past, unfinished writing projects, hanging around my neck.

So, if your writing resolutions have faltered, take a step back, look if there are any previous projects that you didn't finish and are holding you back. Finishing these might be all you need to move forward.
 
Thank you so much, Julie. I'm sure this will encourage many writers not to give up. And I'm sure other readers will join me in wishing you every success in the future. We look forward to reading more and more books from you. 

[ Julie's books can be found on Amazon, and her blog address is 
         http://jlpwritersquest.blogspot.co.uk/ ]